Skip to main content

About your Search

English 51
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
germany can win this year. it has been a while, and that would really boost our image. >> the titles in the europa and spanish leagues have often gone to spanish and english clubs, but they have also a a hig price. else is financially depen other premier league clubs have rackedndds of millions of euros in debt. european soccer's governing body is planning to level the playing field with financial fair playlet regulations. last week, as he issued a one- season than. most of the big stars and their cash in spain or england. >> in england, you already know the top for your clubs before the season starts, so full credit to hourly -- you already know the top four clubs. >> the league has been plagued by hooliganism, which has resulted in an empty stands. for years, the bundesliga has drawn the highest spectator numbers of any league in europe. combined with steadily rising television rights, they have made a solid foundation for german soccer. the only thing missing is that elusive european title. >> we hope they get it. if you are just joining us, you are watching the "journal" coming t
. >> with more and more shoppers seeking out handcrafted and traditional gifts, germany's famous christmas markets struggled to keep up with the demand. tens of thousands of egyptians are out protesting against president morsi at this hour after an islamist-led assembly raced through the approval of a new constitution, a move to end the crisis. >> the document is based on sharia law. critics say it ignores fundamental democratic principles and marginalizes the nation's large christian populations. it has set the stage for conflict in a more increasingly divided nation. >> opponents of the president are outraged at the document adopted by the assembly. protesters are maintaining a vigil, and demonstrations are growing. critics warn that egypt is fast becoming an islamic state. >> hosni mubarak never divided the egyptian people. now, there is president morsi, and we do not know if he is the president of egypt or the president of the muslim brotherhood. >> islamists who dominate the assembly have already answered that question -- the body signed off on all 234 articles of the constitution, wh
ahead. >> germany's exports running high as firms continue to ship goods. nato has approved turkey's request for the deployment of patriot anti-missile systems to areas along its border with syria. turkey wants the patriots to help it intercept street fire from syria's civil war. >> the alliance has also expressed its grave concern of reports that syria may be preparing to use chemical weapons against rebel forces. the statement echoes a strong warning issued by u.s. president barack obama on monday. >> more than 40,000 people have been killed since the uprising began in march 2011. here's a look at what the alliance's defense will look like on turkey's border to syria. >> it is designed to detect, intercept, and hit an enemy missile. there are batteries like these stationed in germany. some could be deployed to turkey within weeks. berlin is calling it a legitimate request from a nato ally. >> turkey has already been hit by cross-border mortar fire from syria, so it is understandable that turkey is holon and has asked the alliance for a sign of solidarity. refusing that request wo
granted himself sweeping powers. that prompted some judges to call for an indefinite strike. >> germany is reported to be considering the export of tanks and armored vehicles to saudi arabia, a country which is already -- has already used its weapons to put down a popular uprising in the country neighboring. >> they say that hundreds of boxer armoured patrol vehicles -- should the deal goes through, it would make the government an accomplice to islamist extremists, some said. >> saudi arabia is reportedly looking to purchase several hundred of these boxer armoured patrol vehicles. "der spiegel" magazine says this was discussed last week at a meeting. a government spokesman declined to comment. >> confidentiality protect interest of potential buyers, as well as our relations with such countries. many requests are turned down. even if they are proved, they often do not ultimately lead to a deal. >> the blonde is where -- the bundeswehr currently uses the boxer as a transporter. it could be used to crush popular uprisings. germany's opposition is concerned that the saudi royal family, whic
a class action suit against germany in a court in the western city of bonn. >> those claims are related to an air strike ordered by a german officer in northern afghanistan in 2009, which killed 90 civilians. germany had given some compensation to the victims' families without admitting responsibility. >> lawyers representing survivors of the air strike are demanding higher compensation -- more than 3 million euros in total. they complain the settlements arrived at immediately following the attack were too small. as far as the german government is concerned, the case is closed. >> 5000 u.s. dollars was paid in over 90 instances. this money was transferred to an account in afghanistan. the account was specifically designed to compensate these families. >> on september 4, 2009, a u.s. f-15 fighter jets bombed two fuel tankers, killing more than 90 civilians. a german officer called in the air strike based on faulty intelligence. the political repercussions were extensive. the german defense minister at the time was forced to step down for his handling of the affair. >> coming up later in
for the united states, but for the world economy, too, also for germany, but people do not know, and they do not like the prospect of a decision may be taking more time, may be even reaching into the year 2013. it would be a pretty bad start, a rumbly start to the new year, people think. the trading was careful. the shares lost some momentum in late trading, late european trading when the u.s. began in the negative zone, and the fact that people were nervous also demonstrated by a lot of money going into the suppose it's safe haven of german bonds and into gold. >> let's take a look at the latest market numbers for you, starting in germany. the dax ended the day just a tad up. euro stoxx 50 also made gains on the day. crossing over to new york, the picture is quite different. a lot of pessimism there. the euro gaining some ground against the dollar. it is not the only source of uncertainty in the world economy. >> a leading economic think tank says confidence is down in many german sectors compared to this time last year. the big picture does not actually looks so bad. >> the economy may hav
. >> absolutely. the message is also very clear. we are here because we follow policies dictated by germany. therefore, italy should come out of the straight jacket. this is the message that berlusconi is sending to italians and actually, i think, it's a message that he will use for our campaigns. >> how much support will he get if he's at 15% right now in the polls 12347. >> my concern is that he could actually create some allians with other -- with the populist leaders. there is a lot of discontent and it's quite easy to capture the discontent. it would provide a majority for ruining the country, for governing the country, but it will not enough to destabilize the debate. they say the p.w. trust say that 30% now say the euro has been a good thing in italy. i don't know whether you back that sort of trust. >> oolt r it's how you present it. there is a clear fact that going down economically for a long time. it hasn't had good growth in more than a decade. so more now are in the face in malaise. at the moment, we don't see that. >> what do you take for investors? >> we've already had issues
markets incidentally, too. bond markets, the fixed income markets, here we're seeing buying in germany at the moment and 10-year german bund around 3%. a little bit of buying into the gild as well as some of the safe haven trades back on. we have this italian bond auction. the first one is going to be settled in 2013 and the last one in this year, as well. it's thought that it is going to see solid demand given that it hasn't gotten any trouble getting off the ground as of late with those bond auctions, as well. a quick wrap on the forex market. here you're looking at selling in the euro/dollar right now. 1.3190. we're flirting with the high level of this trading range that we've been stuck in. dollar/yen, it's thought when this new japanese government coming into place, they're simulating the economy and to make sure a weaker yen is in place, as well. kelly. >> louisa, thanks. we're keeping an eye on gold today. could the precious metal be losing its luster come 2013? we'll find out why kuts has decided to cut exposure to the precious metal for the first time. >>> hello, everybody. we
's germany. other countries, which have reduced carbon emissions have done so because their economies have collapsed, places like russia, eastern europe. and for the rest of the world growth has basically meant increases in carbon. so the idea that comes from mainstream economics that you can decouple carbon from the size of the economy is not at all born out over the last 20 years. >> it's born out of germany. if someone can do it, it can be done, right? is that the answer? >> well, they've had very little slow gdp growth. and there they are an unusual economy. they've been able to export a lot of their -- big export surplus. >> everyone want to be germany. in the future, we will all be net exporters. >> can i make what is going to sound in this context like the naive case for growth and remind us why -- >> i want you to. >> why it's actually important? so, you know, let's stipulate yes, climate change is really important and, yes, juliet is absolutely right. it's really hard to do both at the same time but we have to be really careful to sort of -- it can be easy to say, let's forget abo
of pigsticking making headlines in spain. property rises in germany are leaving some without a home. and mistaken identities in poland's presidential plane crash. there's something rather medieval in the idea of a sport where men on horseback chase while boris with spears. it is an archaic sport, once hugely popular in spain. then it was banned, but now it is making a comeback. this traditional hunting method is being legalized by a number of regions. even the spanish environment ministry is backing the move, hoping to see a rise in takings in national parks as a result of people buying hunting permits, but animal rights activists are far from happy, calling the horseback hunting savage. >> this is a story from spain about wild boars and a controversial method of hunting them. but it is also a story about a country in crisis and how one is sacrificed for the good of the other. this is a member of the old gentry. hunting has been in his family's blood for generations. he is helping revive the tradition of hunting wild boar on horseback with spears. the sport, known as pigsticking, was long banned,
to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is this agreement? >> the early hours of the morning. one may wonder whether that's good news for sw
. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chief strategist from loop capital markets. chris, good morning. we wake up without a deal.
processing firms are leading the recovery. >>> and germany's latest exports seems to be recession proof. it's a tradition dating back to the middle ages, but germany's christmas markets are more popular than ever. nbc's andy eckh artson sends this report. >> every december, music rix out across girlny's favorite christmas market. berlin alone hosts more than 80 markets, each with its own character where the sights, sounds and smells of christmas combine to keep your financial crisis at bay. >> we don't feel a crisis. when you look around here at the christmas market, you meet so different people from germany and it's so popular to come to berlin. christmas season is present season. >> over the past 20 years, germany's christmas markets have become a big attraction and big business. analysts estimate that the german christmas market industry brings in billions of dollars annually. for many small businesses and traditional craftsmen, the markets are the main source of income for the year. makia, one of only ten mammoth ivory carvers in germany has seen his annual turnover grow since 2003. eve
with the british army against nazi germany. he took part in the allied invasion of normandy, a bloody battle that claimed thousands of lives. then he, you know, left ireland to go fight in the war because he just got married. he wanted to make a difference. he still had a wife and seven children. grandchildren as he got older. just what you would want to be as a man, i suppose. >> he wants justice for his grandfather, but time is running out. philip is over 90 years old. he never shows off his medals for bravery. even today, nearly 70 years later, he is afraid of the irish authorities. he deserted the irish army to fight for the british, and he was sent to prison when he returned. the trauma has remained with him. this is the first time his family has let anyone film him. strangers and even more so a video camera make him nervous. >> he is still nervous at this ste. i would want to see an apology, maybe, a thank you, a pardon for the paranoia he has gone through, the suffering wondering if a knock on the door means you get punished again and again. >> patrick started a petition to pardon the
is fascinating bearing in mind where we are in terms of the macro story and germany might well be floating -- >> certainly a big departure in the sense that the german stock market has typically traded in line with the german economy and this is a big divergence. so that's a change. but looking over time, all stocks have the component of what they call the economic return. speculative return which is it for change and the valuation that the market puts on it. over time, one is a possum gain and the other is zero sum gain. sometimes good news, sometimes bad news. but over time the kind of net being nothing. >> we'll see what happens. good to have you on. we'll be out in westminster, joined by the british shadow business secretarier to. we'll talk currencies. find out why one strategist is bullish on the currency. after the ramp up in m&a that we've seen this year, we'll also speak to an expert in los angeles that says the fundamentalses for deal activity in 2013 are looking more solid. so where will the money flow in the new year, that's at 11:20. and the outlook for u.s. credit market appe
to get the latest results from germany's survey any second now. in the meantime, i can can bring you news. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect to see? >> reporter: we're expecting the second consecutive month to the upside for the business sentiment next year in germany. november was a surprise after six months to the downside. we expect december to book i
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold stand
. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in britain, the chancellor george osbourne delivers his statement to parliament today. will be out in westminster soon. steve is out to give us more detailed analysis of what to expect. let's just go back to the eurozone. as you say, thin advances here. are we capping -- it's up against the yen as well. there's obviously been a big yen story. >> yeah, i think the euro/yen has had perhaps more to do with eu euro/dollar than anything else. the euro crosses in general have been story rather than euro/dollar and euro/yen at the forefront. i think the euro/yen forecast is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the n
won't do particularly well, but germany and italy maybe next year have a potential surprise on the upside. >> how much of a surprise? >> it will not be a fast recovery. the ecb will be forced to do more, but they'll be drald dragged into it. so things will have to get worse before they act. so i don't really think -- >> what more actions? they have a t program waiting to go. what more actions are you talking about? >> the key policy rate for the ecb is likely indeed in the first quarter. they can take dpopt deposit rate negative. by the middle of next year, they'll be doing outright qe. i've been talking about this for ages. they haven't done it so maybe they won't do it. but i'm assuming that the outlook for inflation for the eurozone is -- >> how are they going to get around -- look, i know the bundes bank has a fear of hyper inflation. i just don't -- are they going to get around all the -- because even if they do it on the inflation mandate, are they going to get around the objections about outright money printing? germans would see it as that. >> they would see it as ou
, 1.63. and bond yields higher. they got kicked higher in germany post that survey which we broke on the show, as well. as far as the currency market, dollar bit under pressure ahead of the fed. euro/dollar 130.08. we were down late friday and early monday trade, as well. dollar/yen, highs polls suggest mr. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's detailed plan on urban development. strengthening main line blue chips pushed the hang seng to a 16-month high. developers, industrials, and gaming stocks among the top gamers today. >>> in japan the country's
this crisis very well. germany, for example, is doing much better than the united states. the employment has shrunk to the last few years. basically cause the entire crisis. we began at about 5%. we went up to 10% in vietnam at eight and a half%. does not a recovery at all. the germans a doing well. they have one of the best safety nets in europe. there provision of services for other people has not been icons of their having a hard time. the other parts of europe that are doing quite nicely as scandinavia. famous for the quality and quantity of their safety. the idea that european problems because they have the sickened at requires you not to know much . the store. having said that, the crisis is very real in your, and i would urge all of you to pay attention because europe is a very, very important player in the world. in many ways the number one player. but if you take that european market together more people and more product. that is a very important part of the world economy, as important as the american states. also the place in the world that has had more violent warfare among dismem
. in austria and germany, the unemployment rate is about 5%. it has been 164 days since julian assange seeked silence in ecuador. he is wanted for questioning in sweden over allegations of sexual assault, but the price tag has cost the taxpayer over $3 million. >> he is the man that shot to fame for selling state secrets when he website released confidential american cables. in 2010, to swedish women accused him of sex crimes. faced with extradition, he fled to the embassy saying the swedish authorities did not guaranteed not to send them to the u.s.. to promote a new book he has written, he speaks out. >> the swedish government refuses to behave in a way that is at all normal, rational, were reasonable. that is why i have been granted political asylum. >> they say he must face questioning. they are outside the embassy 24 hours a day, waiting to arrest him the moment he walked out. it has cost 21 million pounds and counting. he is reported to be eating a lot of take away food, running on a treadmill and using a special lamp to get vitamin d. he appeared in robust health despite suggestions th
for germany, which is a positive and will be a good gain forward. but say order box, very weak. demand, very weak. business confidence very weak and this is going to be hitting activity indicators going forward. >> even though the manufacturing side of it disappointed, the services was stronger. while services is a big part of the economy, it's where we're trying to see the rebalancing in the german economy happen. from that point of view, probably a rather encouraging development. >> it is interesting. it's also very exportwise. what we saw on these numbers was german exports falling sharply again. and this is just signaling that global economic conditions, soft patch very weak, particularly for the region -- i'm sorry, within the eurozone itself. >> and it's consistent with the weakening global demand we're seeing out of japan and other areas this morning. but it's not necessarily -- if you look at the details of what this is telling us across the globe, frankly a point to deceleration in activities. >> and maybe the global economy will continue to expand. they will signal that china is co
to the economy. >> i'm wondering whether germany as we look at -- they're just above sort of recession territory at the moment. i'm wondering whether if they get better growth out of asia, that will offset the weakness that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to
when they fund german business and the rest of the eu would like to do it and germany won't. seems like a bit of a sticking point to me. >> there are lots of sticking points. first of all, who is going to be the supervisor. for the eurozone, it would be the ecb. but if the ecb is the one big gorilla on the block sitting there in all the meetings so to speak for 17 country, then all the others even if they have their own voice will be slightly sidelined because there's one big power and all the others are split up. so there was a discussion should there be a eurozone supervisor, that doesn't quite work. do we need a some rice or who works for everybody he, where should that sit. brussels, also lots of question marks. and obviously then we get to the point where all the deposit insurances lie. every country has a different scheme. so i think we're a far cry away from having anything like a european banking union. >> i would tend to agree as ever. thank you for now. we'll catch you a little later. how much of this matters? investors say if we move toward a banking union, you can't have any
, not made in germany, not made in china, not made in the u.s. made in the world. 60% of trading manufacturers is in some -- the import content of exports at rate worldwide was 20% years ago, is 40% now and might be 60% 20 years from now. so it's a totally different world from the one many people have in mind where, you know, your country was producing country which my country was consuming and this was a sort of relationship, hands, export this, import that. in this world, the global value changes. you need to import in order to export and use your competitive advantage. so it's a different pattern and i think this has consequences which most governments have, i think, not yet really realized, which is why we've launched this initiative together with the oecd to sort of measure trading at a value and we will probably be unveiling the first batch of trade in value added numbers mid january. our statistical missions are working extremely hard. these guys won't have a great christmas break, but i think that will look very, very, very difference from what we have today. >> just in t
's a union story that tells something about the rebalancing in the eurozone. potentially germany. we know with the xetera dax up .3%. and almost 30% this year. investors see if the euro project hangs together, it's going to mean renation in germany. that is some wage inflation, some price inflation. the public sector union verde, powerful union, along with some others with its contract up at the end of the year is asking, guys, for a 6.5% pay rise next year. it got about 2.5% for the last couple of years. it is on the public sector side but also an example of what kind of pay hikes we may see flowing through to the german economy. if that helps support spending, despite weak industrial production figures and concern about growth prospects, there may be some rebalancing toward the german consumer taking on more of the heavy lifting across the eurozone. so one to keep an eye on, guys. >> thank you very much. we shouldn't see that as the unions pressuring -- they probably are pressuring for higher wages, but there's been pressure on germany to drive more inflation in germany to help lift the
there really divergent from the rest of europe. germany up on the right, a good gain up over 1%, the italian market falls by 1%. silvio berlusconi is back in italian politics proving he still runs his party and withdrawing support from mario monti. this may lead to midterm elections because monti is market friendly you might not end up with a market friendly solution. we thought we'd have elections march/april, there's the prospect it could be a snap election much earlier perhaps in the new year. now the good news is there isn't a huge amount of blowout on the bonds at the short end of the italian markets. the yields are higher but not huge relative to where we've been but on the ten-year italian market you can see we're slightly higher but no great shakes overall. it means the rally in the peripheral bond market we've witnessed in italy and spain has now stalled at this stage. remember we had the auction in spain yesterday and the yields are slightly higher relative to where we've been, they're still relatively depressed. we talk about the problems in europe, i thought it was worth pointing
in germany. but the un has had a very strong influence on less. >> po will not old enough to remember, but jimmy carter gave billions of dollars to up alternate energy projects. >> i do remember. i was of the people who had to wait in gas lines in the 1970's. >> to any of those plants still exist? i don't think it lasted more than a couple of years. secondly, are you familiar with another program where he gave money to build five different steel mills, four of went with -- board of which went bankrupt almost immediately and the fifth one put at a business the plan in kansas city in. >> well, jimmy carter's programs did not work then, as i mentioned, i remember waiting in the 1970's in gas lines for one or two hours to fill up with gasoline in the western d.c. area. and just as these programs did not work then and they are not working now, they're unlikely to work in the future. it is just that the government is not good at picking winning projects. the government promised it would not have thought of picking the apple iphone five. that is something that is expensive, but people wait i
call. asia was up 13. europe was up 12. adding employees to europe, france, germany, very strong. similar to what bill mcdermott has been saying. we are all so doom and gloom about europe, ellison's talking about it's a bright spot. >> what about germany today, up again for december, as we mentioned at the top of the show, above $1.33 a day. something's going on there. the big upgrade on greece. that's kind of strange, right? >> up four or five notches. >> i have to stand up for a second. $8. >> is it finally time? >> i want to click my heels, but these are soft reeboks. you wouldn't hear it. >> are we going to see that, finally, at last? >> the way people were coming on and saying it's going to zero. >> running for the exit. >> when was the euro dissolved and greece kicked out? what was the date? >> it happened just in reverse. >> it was overnight. >> we'll see. i can't believe 2013 will not hold a couple of moments where we go, ah. but it is amazing. nothing we can do. >> we're afraid spain is going to come -- spain was supposed to come to market. italy, oh, my, what happens wh
. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rates products at morgan stanley. the probe is aimed at establishing whether hadden's late trades hat manipulate closing prices and made other trades more profitable. also singapore airline says that it is in talks with interested parties to sell its 49% stake in virgin atlantic. delta is reportedly among the po
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
of the past. for them, correcting the injustice was more important than making germany a better country. unfortunately, we see similar tendency among many revolutionary guard. they no longer have a religious base the same way the clerics have but are using terror in order to control the population, particularly they're fond of show trials. staliniist show trials. we have people who are the rulers of iran in he 1980s, who today themselves have been slaves to the system. they show up at trials, and they confess being agents for the cia , mousad, and of course no one believes. no one. not a subject iranian believes these people, who served the revolution have completely become counterrevolutionary. but the idea is to look into the hearts of the iranian public, telling them that the chosen prime minister of khomeini, if he is not -- if he has to appear on short trial, if people who were cabinet ministers in the 1980s have to an short trial. this this change which is taking place. >> thanks, ali. emanuel, i wanted to move on to you, in light of what marina said about the indifference she fel
at germany. a lot of -- >> hong kong, germany, you name it. >> germany up 29% year-to-date. that has a lot to do with the ucb and the eurozone. this is a relative gain. lost in this conversation for a lot of u.s. investors, they are u.s. investors. they can't really invest globally to the same degree that we talk about, we say germany is up 29%, for a lot of investors that's out of their reach. >> if we didn't have the cliff today, we would have best trades of the year, jamie dimon buying jpmorgan when the whale hit. things looked really dark. some of the best trades happened obviously when it looked like the stocks were in for real trouble. >> look at the greek stock market. look at greek debt. i think it was third point that established a prominent position in greek debt and saw x number of returns thereafter. >> draw the lessons to today. as we teeter on the cliff, what would be the fear trade that people are shunning right now but may turn out to be the best trade looking back? >> i think it's something we already mentioned, and that's the defense sector. >> the sequestration sector is
-800-345-2550 this morning, i'm going to trade in hong kong. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 be
china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all these buildings going up. here we are being told in the united states that maybe we should reduce ourselves from four years to three years. another aspect. let me insert here so much of what our discussio
at this hour, there they, they're all down. not great in france, but germany down about .7% and the ftse down fractionally. other news out of europe, debt tieback for from an day to receive additional buyback offers. those would be at deeply discounted prices and that would help lower the country's debt lead. >>> in asia, stocks touched a 16-month high and closed mostly higher on the session with good gains, as you can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's
. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> good to see you. >> all right. stay tuned. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. >>> trip adviser and deutsche bank. >> deutsche bank likes this company. people love it. trip adviser is king. >> deutsche buying a hold on apache. >> apache has been such a dog. bad for apache. >> an a darko? >> ever since the daily, and other litigation, this is an inexpensive stock. i-like it. >> deutsche on omc. >> what's interesting, they're talking about negative momentum in ad
. spain was borrowing at 7%. >> germany went to the five-year high. we could have that, too. unlike them, our economy is not in tatters. they go five-year high on tatters. audi, good car. >> yes. good car. >> meantime, shares of costco this morning up in the premarket. warehouse retailer earned 95 cents a share in the first fiscal quarter. revenue, profit margins beating forecasts helped by rising sales. those higher membership fees did hike fees a year ago november, which doesn't happen very often. the journal today says, model looks great. the business is great. the stock is just -- people want to pay a lot of money for it, jim. >> oh, yeah, costco, those are remarkable numbers. i know you did an excellent special on coastco and it seems like the execution was impressive. people want to go there. >> as gas prices come down, that helps them, given they make it a bit of a loss leader. valuation rich for your blood. >> when you go to buy a house, you see kirkland more than any other brand. you can say, jim, that's not even -- i mean, what percent -- i am a real fan customer for kirkland.
at all. [ overlapping speakers ] >> spain has about the same debt to gdp ratio as germany. that good enough for you? >> [ overlapping speakers ] >> hang on, fellows. let's not get hung up on spain. what i want to come back to is the usa. because our market has not collapsed, it's really different than it looks like it was back in 2011. i just want to ask, is it better to own those low-rate bonds right now? or jim la camp, i want you both to weigh in quickly. is it better to own corporate bonds or treasury bonds during this tiff over the fiscal cliff, or is it better to own stocks? real quick. >> well, short term we're going to have a lot of gyrations. but those yields are under the inflation rate. you're getting negative real returns on these. that's one of the reasons the stock market has been more buoyant. >> and don luskin, is it better to own bonds during this fiscal cliff tiff? >> yes, december is the time to be risk off folks. the market's in complete denial. total complacency. the fiscal cliff will create a crisis like the debt ceiling negotiation did that led to the bottom 16
pillow at special 30% savings. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their localurrencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-50 firms li ned davis researc tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-342550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 20. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no
from germany and asked, how did she get the unemployment rate -- improve the unemployment rate that quickly? she said they immediately made a decision to whether i saw the homes in germany. that's energy efficiency rate their future but all the people back to work and from the 3% as the kinds of things you could do. >> picking people up the inconvenient truths at one point was that movie and "avatar" sometimes supposed to be that movie. do you think there's an environmental movie to change peoples minds? >> the inconvenient truth is screaming loud for a sequel because the inconvenient truth has exposed the problem, but it is not ever really told us about his dissolution. i think the next step one has to do is people are waiting for a very important project as "avatar" with a convenient truth, other films are very good because no matter how you put it, as i said in my speech, people don't care if you're breathing republican era democratic era. people just want to breathe air. but when they go to the faucet, they want to turn on the water and know that water is clean and not pack
close to an 8 1/2-month high. germany at a 52-week high. the euro at a 7 1/2-month high. things are still moving. china, big debate on the trough here. this is the debate the last two months here. goldman sachs upped its fourth quarter gdp estimates, 7.8% now instead of 7.6%. look, nobody's thinking china's going to go back to 10% or 12%. that's over. 8, 8 1/2, somewhere around there. there is good evidence now that q-4 might be the trough for china. this has been a big debate. a lot of people saying it's going to be weaker in 2013. real estate prices are improving. electricity consumption improving a little bit. industrial production, all of them looking better in the last couple of months. i think that's generally a positive. the one big thing i want to point out, if you watch what's going on in japan, we've got a new prime minister who's coming in who's putting intense pressure on the bank of japan, essentially trying to break their independence essentially. he's told them they've got to increase their inflation target from 1% to at least 2%, and told they have to start massi
aircraft. but this move part of a nato response. also supplied by germany and holland whose parliament last week approved their contributions. the u.s., though, of course, putting a number of people on the ground. many observers saying that now nato has physical troops and presence in the area that it risks somehow being dragged into this particular conflict. everybody is stressing these are purely there to defend turkey, a staunch nato member. john? >> they still come as the u.s. offered diplomatic recognition to the rebels in syria and with 400 u.s. troops there, it does give the u.s. some skin in this game. >> reporter: absolutely. i don't think the troops will be involved. skin in the game, certainly. the obama administration though many say caught between two different sides here. at the same time, the day before they gave some kind of lower level diplomatic recognition to the syrian government. the day before that they were a terror group, one of the more hard line parts of the rebel front responsible for many victories, considered islamic hard-liners. to many degrees they're heroes b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)